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Kitten Care

Where To Learn More About Keeping Your Kitten Healthy?

There’s a huge array of resources that will help you to keep your kitten healthy. What you need to know is which ones will help you to keep your kitten healthy! One of the best sources of information is your veterinary clinic. Not only will they be able to provide you with free leaflets and information, they may also have their own guide they give out to new kitten owners, and books that they suggest you read or have on your reference shelf in case of emergency. There are so many books published on the subject of cat and kitten care that it’s easy to get lost, or pick up a book that’s not quite as comprehensive as it could be, and a recommendation or two from your veterinary can allow you to choose between books that he thinks are the best ones available for your situation.

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Fleas And Your Kitten

When you look at the new feline addition to your home, it’s hard to imagine that it could have anything like fleas. Unfortunately, it’s not unheard of for a very young kitten to have fleas; it all very much depends upon the environment in which it lived before you brought it to live with you. For example, if the mother cat had fleas, then there’s a huge possibility that all the kittens will have fleas. If there was another pet in the home such as another cat, or dog, then again, there’s a possibility that even though the mother cat wasn’t allowed out while she was nursing her kittens, fleas were brought in by the other pets. Even humans can bring fleas into a home on their shoes or clothes.

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Should You Train Your Kitten To Use A Litter Box?

The short answer to this is YES! Even if you are going to allow your cat to be outdoors whenever it wants, you need to be sure that if ever there was a time when it couldn’t get outside for whatever reason, it’s already potty trained and can use the litter tray whenever necessary. It may not be happy using the litter tray but you probably don’t care about that should you find yourself in a situation where allowing your kitten outside isn’t an option. It could be that you need to be out of town for a few days and you don’t want to leave your cat door unlocked for security reasons, so your kitten needs to kept indoors. It could be that it’s too cold, especially at night in the winter, so you want to keep him inside so he doesn’t come to harm in sub-zero temperatures.

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Introducing A New Kitten To An Existing Cat

Cats and kittens in the same household can be the best of friends, or the worst of enemies, and occasionally, both at various times of the day!  One of the main problems is that cats are very territorial and if one cat thinks that a particular part of the room is his alone, he will soon show his displeasure if the kitten should dare to walk anywhere near it.  On the other hand, a kitten will sometimes do just that in order to get the older cat’s attention.  In some ways, kittens are not unlike small children! To ensure that your cat and new kitty get off to the best possible start socially, you need to go against what your heart intuitively wants to do.  Really, this is in kitty’s best interests even though it may make you feel heartless at the time!  Bring the new kitty into the room and leave it in its travel carrier for a while.  Allow your cat to wander around the carrier and get accustomed to the new kitten’s smell – stand nearby and monitor the situation so that the cat doesn’t […]

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How To Kitten Proof Your Home

One of the good rules of thumb to apply here is to think about having a toddler around, only a toddler in miniature size – mobile, curious but tiny!  This means that you need to consider your home in terms of potential kitty hazards before the kitten gets too old and “into everything”.  Although there are some thing that you’d have to do to create a safe home for your toddler that aren’t necessary for a kitten (such as power sockets and drawer locks), there are a few things you should take a look at with a critical eye as to whether or not they present a danger to your kitty. If it’s hanging, or trailing, and it moves then it’s a toy to your kitten!  Make sure that you tie up all loose wire and cables, or use cable tacks and attach them firmly to walls or along the baseboard, counter top, up desk legs, etc so that there’s nothing to attract your cat’s attention.  If he pulls a cable on your tea kettle, or computer keyboard, there’s a big possibility that the item will end up […]

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How Often Will I Need To Take Kitty To The Vet?

The first visit to your local veterinary’s clinic should be as soon after bringing her home as possible.  The vet will be able to assure you that she’s in tip-top condition, advise you on the kind of food and how much she should be having, what shots she should have now, and whether or not she’s currently a home for fleas and worms. This is a good opportunity for you to see how the vet handles the kitten, and also to ask any questions you may have about your cat’s health in general.  Use your time with the veterinary wisely.  Whilst the vet examines kitty, ask if there are any kitten care leaflets you could have, or any books she recommends.

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What Equipment Do You Need When First Buying a Kitten?

Brining home your young kitty is very much like bringing home a newborn baby from the hospital. They both have very simple requirements. Both of them need to have the following basics covered: food, a place to sleep, and love. Food is the first thing that you need to consider, and one way of quickly adjusting your kitten to his new home is to feed it. Make sure that you have a few days supply of whatever food the kitten is used to eating so that there’s no break in nutrition.

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Why Should You Consider Buying Two Kittens Together?

You aren’t likely to get two for the price of one, and when it comes to kittens it’s not cheaper to buy them in bulk when it comes to food and kitty litter either, but there are some compensations that make it worth thinking about. Aside from saving you the initial indecision of whether you want the smart talking black and white kitty, or the cute fluffy ginger tabby, buying two kittens together can actually make sense. Taking a kitten away from its mother can be traumatic for the kitty. Suddenly, everything is strange. There’s a stranger person fussing it and it’s not fun anymore because it can’t see its momma. The siblings aren’t there and they are sitting alone in a box, in a place they don’t recognize, and they’re terrified! Buying two kittens from the same owner should mean that you are buying siblings, or at least two kittens that have been in contact with each other during their first wobbly weeks.

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Grooming Your Kitty

Cats are, by nature, clean animals and don’t like being dirty. This is also true about kittens. Even the youngest kitty can be seen trying to wash itself. There are instances during your cat’s life however when it will be unable to groom itself, or it could be that the kind of cat you choose has high maintenance fur (such as a long hair Persian) and needs a little extra help to keep its fur in good condition. Despite not wanting to be dirty, and despite the constant self-grooming, this does not automatically mean that your kitten is going to enjoy your interference in its personal grooming routine. The best way to avoid this is to introduce your kitten to being groomed by you from the very start. If you get into an immediate habit of combing and brushing kitty once or twice a week, then if the day comes when he’s just in too much mess, or too sick to manage himself, then he won’t mind your intervention.

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The Scoop On Kitty Vaccinations

If you’ve bought a pedigree kitten, it should already have had its shots.  If you’re thinking about buying a pedigree kitten, make sure you get paperwork proving that the vaccinations have been given and they’re all up-to-date.  If you’re buying a non-pedigree cat, a moggy, then you will need to consider the issues surrounding each vaccination yourself. All kittens ought to be vaccinated before they are allowed outdoors.  This is to build their immune system up.  The vaccination program for kitties starts between 6-8 weeks, so it’s possible that if you take kitty home at 8 weeks, he’s already had his first shot.  The shots are given 2-3 weeks apart, and there are usually 3 shots in total.  As a rabies shot is not always included in the initial kitten shots, if your kitty is going to be going outside, then this is an additional vaccination that you should discuss with your veterinary once kitty is 4 months old.

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